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My article in this journal describes the Osudoku Tribal Society’s kinship, political, and ceremonial systems in Osuwem, Ghana, West Africa.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Audience at the Osudoku Chief's ceremony to improve tribal life

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

More Osudoku tribal members at the chief's ceremony

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Drummers and other members of the Osudoku society at the chief's ceremony

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Dancers at the Osudoku chief's ceremony

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Three young adult Osudoku women are wearing one of their required outfits to go through the Puberty Ceremony that improves their status as women in the patrilineal society.

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Osudoku women, men, and drummers in Pentecostal Holiness church service

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

My daughter, stooping over in front of the Osudoku children, is teaching them how to shoot marbles.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The book is a research study of why African American men students drop out of high school and factors that keep other African-American high school men students and white high school men students from dropping out of high school. I conduct this study in the five Norfolk, Virginia, integrated high schools.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The journal includes my article, “Negro Residential Patterns in Atlanta, Georgia, 1860-1983, and their Impact on Public School Mixing. Essentially, white flight results in black students attending newly segregated schools.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The academic research skills handbook helps undergraduate social science majors effectively use the library, collect primary data, develop outlines, and write research papers and abstracts.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The book is a sequence to the above research skills book and enables teachers to teach students higher level term paper writing skills, including internal term paper documentation and end of term paper documentation, endnotes, as well as varied formats for writing bibliographies, Chicago Manual Style and MLA Style.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Family

My article in this journal is entitled "the Black Beauty Parlor Complex in a Southern City." The beauty parlor is viewed as a setting that helps black women adjust to life by providing personal grooming services that enhance their appearance and a setting for communication. It is concluded that beauty parlor services are similar among all social classes in the city. However, as a rule, an inverse relationship exists between social class of customers and significance of hair grooming services and communication, frequency of beauty parlor visits, disposition of customers, and informality of beauty parlor communication.

Hence, black low income and working class women go to beauty parlors where life is informal and vibrant and visits are frequent. On the other hand, middle class women go to beauty parlors less frequent, the atmosphere is serene and quiet, and the charges are higher.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The book is about family life of the Atlanta, Georgia black middle class: residential patterns, black communities, the Royal Oaks Manor neighborhood and their traditional, contemporary, and eclectic room and home decors, family rituals, foods, dining rituals, husband and wife relationships, and raising their children.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The fictional book, except two women, is based on a national study of abused black women in the African-American ethnic group and suggests surefire ways to stop and prevent it.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The book details the major segment (75% of all black children) of black families, unwed parents, and several areas of black single parent life. They are the social and economic background of parents, adverse relationship between single parents, and why young black men and women adults become unwed parents.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

In the book, my article, “African American Teen Pregnancy in the American South,” shows its wide dimension in this area of America and what can be done about it.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

My article, “Single Mothers in Black Colleges," in this book shows that some young adult black unwed mothers struggle to achieve success—get a college education while parenting and working.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

My article, “Black Single Fathers: Continuity, Neutrality, and Change," clarifies that young adult black men do not like to be told they are becoming fathers and nor do they like becoming unwed fathers. Hence, they hold three attitudes toward their new family life: continuity of their previous life, which never works out, neutrality, and change to the new life with lots of conflict with the mothers of their children.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

I help write this book with Eastern Virginia Medical College (EVMS) professors in Norfolk, Virginia to help parents understand how to raise their adolescent children and I speak ten times to white congregations in white churches as well as to numerous black church congregations on my chapter, “Twelve to Eighteen.” The book is edited by Georgeanna Seegar Jones, M.D., who is also co-founder of the Invitro Clinic at EVMS.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Military

The booklet describes military wife abuse around the world based on hard data that I help collect and write up with my co-workers, Dr. Hal Rosen, Dr. John P. Sheposh, Dr. Joyce Shettek-Dutcher, Dr. Jill M. Ralston, and Dr. Steve Talley, under the auspices of the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center in San Diego, California, to show the prevalence of husband and wife violence in military families everywhere.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

I write the 96 page brochure to show differential judicial sentencing among white, black, and Hispanic men in military installations throughout the United States and suggest good strategies to reduce the number of black enlisted men who currently enter the judicial military system. I conduct research for this brochure at the United States Disciplinary Barracks in Fort Worth, Leavenworth, under the sponsorship of the Patrick Air Force Base in Florida.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Racism

The book is about perpetual racism, pernicious and destructive acts, that seeps into blacks' daily lives in enormous guises and hurts their hearts and the companion book, Say it Loud, that I write, suggests ways to help blacks and whites get along together.

WORTH READING

"Local educator's book on racism offers tips"
From the Daily Press, Book Reviews. Newport News, VA, Sunday, January 7, 2001-- Submitted by McKinley Price, D.D.S.

Annie Barnes, Retired Norfolk State professor and former Huntington High School teacher has recently had her book, "Say it Loud" released as Everyday Racism. (Sourcebooks)

The book provides anecdotal examples of racism or prejudice as recounted by 146 black college students from middle class backgrounds, ranging in age of 18 to 40. The students were asked to provide three examples of racism from their lives. The responses were then categorized: at school or day care, at the store, in the workplace, with law enforcement, and during recreation activities.

One student recalled an incident in which human feces were thrown on him from a passing truck. Other students told of police officers assuming innocent bystanders were criminals because of the color of their skin. Others described schoolteachers and counselors limiting educational opportunities for black students, employers taking credit for black workers' achievements or service people providing poor customer service.

Barnes concludes each chapter with a hope for alleviating racism by providing tips for whites and blacks. She offers specific, attainable goals for improving each type of situation. Showing courtesy and professional behavior go a long way in improving perceived injustices.

Barnes's book is a great starting point for opening a dialogue on race relations. No matter what your skin color, you can relate to the hurtful examples of racism.

Copies of her book are available at local bookstores, including Barnes & Noble.

OTHER REVIEWS

Based on numerous readers' evaluations, Everyday Racism receives an almost complete 5 star rating at Amazon.com

*****I COULDN'T PUT IT DOWN, April 29,2002
Reviewer: A reader with a high tech job. When I began reading Annie Barnes's book, Everyday Racism, I couldn't put it down. I read it on my breaks, lunch hour, and at home until I had read every word.

I suggest this book to everybody, especially whites who are old enough to read. It will make them better people. Though I have read many books on race relations, I have not seen one that reaches the heights of Everyday Racism that is written in an unoffensive term. This book is a JEWEL.

*****! Someone Who Finally Tells the Truth, March 19, 2002
Reviewer: cathy guy
Everyday Racism is a must read for everyone who has ever wondered about how the subjects of racism feel. Barnes makes the point that racism is hurtful and that it should be stopped. Not only does she appeal to whites, but she also informs blacks of what they can do as well. This is a real balanced approach to the discussion. Everyday Racism does occur everyday and we should all, black and white alike, make a better effort to consider those who are different from us.

September 11th, should have made us fully aware that the nation belongs to us all and, when terror strikes, it comes to us all. Instead of Everyday racism, we should strive for everyday harmony. Annie S. Barnes has written a wonderful book about how racism affects our lives. She is to be applauded!

REVIEW: On a daily basis, children learn from their parents and grandparents that Black people are not as good as white people, perpetuating a stereotype that has plagued Americans since its founding-- Jackson Advocate Newspaper, Jackson, MS.

***** A MUST READ, March 16, 2002
Reviewer: grace2bc from Georgia
This book was very interesting to me. The stories it tells reveals a lot about the way people are still treated in America. I believe that Dr. Barnes would want people to change their minds and eliminate prejudices. However, I agree with her that we must address the problem of how people act. The way that people act is what hurts others. We have seen many instances of legal means changing the majority of people's actions. This has helped minorities tremendously. Whether or not a person has hatred in their heart, you cannot tell. No one is a mind reader. However, you can easily tell and become hurt when an act is committed against you. The first step is definitely curtailing racist behavior. Along with that, of course, we hope that people's minds change as well.

I recommend this book because so many people who are in the majority are not even aware that minorities suffer from so many slights and in so many ways. This book is definitely an eye-opener that I believe whites should read.

*****Double Impact, March 7, 2002
Reviewer: Lisle Frederick from Brooklyn, NY
As the Student Government Association President of a notable university, it was my pleasure to read this work. Annie Barnes captures the essence of the impact racism has not just on the African American community, but society at large. It is sad that some commentary is ignorant to the difference between prejudice and racism. Let me bring some clarity to all who read. Prejudice is merely an attitude, not manifested into action. However, racism is an actual behavior. This book defines the difference. This literary treasure is dynamic and thought provoking. You must read this with an open mind and heart. If change is really possible, every American must first take inventory of themselves, and then work toward ending everyday racism!


*****Calling it As She See's It, March 18, 2002
Reviewer: rrose8888 from New York City
Annie S. Barnes calls it as she see's it in Everyday Racism. I assigned Barnes's book as required reading in my Diversity in America Education course here at Hunter College in New York City. In selecting it, I felt that it would provide a view of racism that most of my studens had not heard before and nor that even considered.

It certainly met my expectations. Overwhelmingly, most students registered they had never thought of racism in this way. Not only that, but many of them said that without the insights provided by Barnes, they would have never known that so many of their unconscious actions would have been interpreted as racist.

I was very pleased that Barnes's book provided the opportunity for my class to get to think about the experience of others in this way. I will continue to use the Barnes book as part of the assigned readings for my course. And I will probably assign her next book for them to read also.

*****MASTERPIECE. Last night, while I was reading the Richmond Times Dispatch, I saw an article describing your book, Everyday Racism. I was so pleased to see that you had written such a masterpiece when race seems to be the number one problem in our nation---The Reverend Rodney M. Hunter, Richmond, Virginia

*****BEST BOOK ABOUT RACISM
Reviewer: A Reader from Virginia

To my Fellow Americans. Hear Ye! We have a book, Everyday Racism, that can make us a more beautiful country. We are always looking for something good and we have it in Everyday Racism.

As a long-time educator, I feel it a privilege to review this book. I would like for all Americans to know that Annie Barnes used a university research team to come up with a great book. For decades, professors have obtained research help from their students. Hence, she is on target concerning the research team.

Annie Barnes has written things that most whites do every day that they do not want her to say. They are a clear indication that some whites do not think enough of themselves to respect black human beings. I hope this book does what it was intended for--help all whites and blacks to get along amiably.

She writes the truth of every day racism. She understands in Everyday Raci8sm that it is easier to change people's actions than thoughts. As long as people keep their thoughts to themselves, blacks will not have a problem. Whites will just be prejudiced and miserable. Barnes would like for them to get rid of their racist attitudes, but the issue in Everyday Racism is for all whites to stop doing racism to blacks.

Dr. Barnes discusses in Everyday Racism the most important topic that can be discussed about racism, except white churches. What a pleasure to read what this scholar has said in Everyday Racism about good relations living next door to whites, just treatment for little children all the way up to the doctoral level, spending one's money with enjoyment, avoiding adverse police treatment, and dining out. There is nothing that could be more important. She wants good relations between the races so badly, until she tells at the end of each chapter what whites can do and what blacks can do to improve these important areas of our lives.

I am sure that Dr. Barnes knows how to organize a book. It is her seventh. This book lets the victims speak about their racist experiences. All other similar books that I have read, let the authors speak for the victims. What an improvement!

This book is current and not 20, 30 or more years old. Everyday Racism describes racism as it exists today. I wish I could say otherwise, but I can't and tell the truth.

We are privileged to have a scholar with the insight to let people tell their own story. In 1988, she was elected by the State of Virginia as one of the best 13 university teachers in the state and was selected to give the lecture at the corporate banquet honoring them.

I encourage all readers to read Everyday Racism and feel proud that it is a book in which the victims tell America how racism hurts blacks' hearts and minds and asks for togetherness. If we, whites and blacks, do what she asks, we will be a greater America. Please join me in answering her plea..

A READER FROM VIRGINIA

*****I CAN RELATE, April 4, 2002
Reviewer: John J. Moore from Norfolk, Virginia

I can relate to these young people's experiences. One night in September 2000, as I returned from New York to Norfolk, Virginia, I encountered a police officer. I was stopped by a Virginia Police Officer for driving while being black. I came off the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and Tunnel exit, stopped at a traffic light, and made visual eye contact with a patrolman in the other vehicle lane. At that moment, I thought nothing of it and proceeded on my way. I drove several miles occasionally glancing into my rearview mirror to notice that he was following me. I got a bad feeling. I knew something was up. I had driven several miles on Shore Drive to the city limits of Virginia Beach and Norfolk. Right before I crossed into Norfolk, he flashed his lights for me to stop. The officer said this was a routine traffic stop and he wanted to know if this was my vehicle and for me to show him some ID. After a 30 minute delay, during which the patrolman made six trips between my vehicle and his, I was told that I had swerved between traffic lanes and I should be more careful. No ticket was issued by the patrolman. I proceeded on my way home with no other incidents. Go figure! Mrs. Barnes, you hit the nail on the head with this book.

*****STRAIGHT TO THE POINT, March 27, 2002
Reviewer: JD Glover, Retired Veteran/Student from Virginia Beach, Virginia

Everyday Racism tells exactly what many people of color must endure in their daily walks of life. It is a must read for everyone who wants to know the truth. This book should create awareness that racism is still alive today and all of God's people (regardless of color) should unite as one to end this dividing evil. A big thumbs up to Professor Barnes .

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Say it Loud is the companion book to Everyday Racism. James Brown sang, in 1968, "I'm black, and I'm proud." During the civil rights era, African Americans take pride in James Brown's message. In the late 1990s many believe the need for such affirmations have long since faded. Yet the stories compiled in this book about racism indicate that James Brown's, The Godfather of Soul Music, message should still be heeded today, 2016, and, therefore, we black Americans should feel genuinely proud about being black and add a new thing. Here is that new thing. We should always elevate quiet activities and dedication, efficiency, accuracy, high productivity, fine mixture of humility and confidence, and good manners here, there, and everywhere.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

South Africa Tourism Culture

Mr. Nelson Mandela is the first president of South Africa and his stature and name are everywhere, including squares. In Johannesburg, South Africa, there is a Mandela Square with a giant stature of him, a large courtyard, and restaurants. People from all over the world, especially young people, visit the square, meet and make friends, eat delicious South African food, drink highly satisfying South African wine, and hold perpetual conversation. My visit in the courtyard and in a restaurant are unforgettable with great food and great wine.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


Our South African Tour Guide

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Bennie and I go on a Safari and see the following animals and a crocodile.

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Our tour group gives Bennie and me a 51st wedding anniversary party and per their request, Bennie and I kiss. The wedding anniversary party enjoys seeing us kiss and becomes hilarious.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


Bennie and I go on a four mile round-trip hike with our tour group and people from other parts of the world.

The hike requires all of us to use walking sticks to climb the steep hills. It is fun and work.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


I ride an ostrich—the fastest animal ride I have ever taken and success could only be achieved by holding, tightly, to the ostrich. Otherwise, I would fall off. I find the fast ride thrilling and laugh all the way.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Bennie and I ride an elephant whose baby elephant walks with her.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Bennie and I pet a "pet" cheetah.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The following flowers and landscape are in a botanical garden.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website



South African dancers invite me to dance with them and I welcome the opportunity. By imitating their movements, I pop my fingers, step lively, and shake all the right parts of my body.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


This is a sample of South African Tourism culture and ends for Bennie and me and our tour group at The Cape of Good Hope.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


Now, I invite you to visit Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, Africa, with me.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Zimbabwe Tourism Culture

The following are scenes in and around the beautiful Victoria Falls Hotel, where our tour group, Bennie, and I stay.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website




I welcome good conversation after dining.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

I am visiting Victoria Water Falls in November, 2013, located at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe and it is the dry season. Yet, I see beautiful scenes and I am sharing two with you. Judging by the rock structure of Victoria Falls, in the rainy season, she is an elegant lady.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

The text you type here will appear directly below the image
The rainbow and falls are beautiful.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

We have night life in Zimbawe that occurs during their outdoor dining called Boma dining. The outdoor restaurant is nestled in a flourishing green environment. We are given drums and I like the sounds of my beats and drummers, dancers, and singers keep the stage lively. They invite me to join them. Also, South African food, including an abundance of entrees, Mopani worms, and foods from across the world, are available in the restaurant.

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website


In Zimbabwe, mopani worms are a staple part of the diet in rural areas and are considered a delicacy in the cities. They can be eaten dry, as crunchy as potato chips, or cooked and drenched in sauce. The worms can be mighty tasty and they're very nutritious. They are one of my favorite foods in Zimbabwe and in South Africa. Here's the scoop on mopani worms.

The worm is the large caterpillar of the Gonimbrasia belina species, commonly called the emperor moth. It's called a mopani worm because it feeds on the leaves of mopani trees after it hatches in summer..


Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

A stature of a person carrying a bag of mopani worms

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website

Bennie and I and other tourists, from various parts of the world, gather at a tour meeting place and walk with lion cubs. However, the day we walk with the cubs, is their last day as youth. The next day they are taken to the wilds to become full grown lions. Walking with lion cubs gives us the opportunity to pet and feel their lovely fur and enjoy a great experience. However, our tour guides teach us the lion culture in case one turns on us. Specifically, they give us poles and, if a lion turns toward one, the person should point the pole in his eyes and say STOP. We actually see it occur, but cannot guarantee it will always work. Though my walk with two lions is memorable, somehow, I do not recommend the highly favorable tourism culture because there is too much risk involved./font size>

Copyright 2017 Annie Shaw-Barnes Website



Selected Works

Articles
In the Phylon journal, my article "The Black Beauty Parlor Complex in a Southern City" examines the role of the beauty parlor in the adaptation of black women, by social class, in Newport News, Virginia. In the Virginia Social Science Journal, young adult men are adamant about becoming unwed fathers.